Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology

Public Health Minor

Being Health Literate

Human health impacts our individual biology as well as the natural, built, and social environments in which we live, work, and play. The ability to integrate a health perspective is important not only in our personal lives but it also strengthens disciplines beyond traditional health-related and clinical fields.

A minor in public health introduces students to public and population health principles and research methodologies. Students can integrate public health perspectives into many careers like allied and professional health fields, graduate programs in biology and physiology, as well as law, the social sciences, policy, and engineering.

Being a Community Partner

Advocating for and implementing better water and sanitation systems in underserved communities or creating a marketing plan centered around making healthier food choices are some of the ways a minor in public health can serve the community. With a minor in public health from Michigan Tech, students will learn how to determine community needs, develop or enhance plans based on those needs, and effectively partner with stakeholder groups to implement solutions-based programs. Over the past 15 years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance academia plays in teaching these skills. In 2002, an Institute of Medicine report recognized the need to better educate the public health workforce and partners that play key roles in the health of our communities who are not in traditional public health positions.

As COVID-19 has made abundantly clear, the health of our neighbors and our environment, whether globally or next-door, affects the health of each one of us. Our community's health impacts every part of our society. We cannot separate health from any of our fields, but must instead learn how to integrate a health perspective into your chosen careers.

Kelly Kamm Assistant Professor, Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology
Kelly Kamm
Assistant Professor, Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology

Requirements

Courses listed are relevant to important domestic and global public health specialties such as health promotion and communication, health disparities, public health microbiology, environmental health, and health policy. Public health topic courses are organized to suggest relevance to specialties; students may take any combination of the courses listed.

Students must complete 18 credit hours as detailed below, with at least 9 credit hours at a level of 3000 or higher.

Core Requirements (12-13 credit hours)

BL 3230 - Medical Bacteriology

Study of pathology, identification, isolation and antimicrobic susceptibility testing of clinically important bacteria.

  • Credits: 4.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (2-0-5)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Pre-Requisite(s): BL 3210

BL 3970 - Current Health Issues

Introduction to health issues, such as: infectious diseases, obesity, mental health, healthcare disparities, health insurance, drug addiction, and vaccines. Students will analyze health issues from a diverse cultural, ethical, social, and global perspective.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring, Summer
  • Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman
  • Pre-Requisite(s): UN 1015 and (UN 1025 or Modern Language - 3000 level or higher)

BL 4752 - Cancer Biology

Emphasis on characteristic genetic, molecular, and cellular changes leading to cancer. Topics will include the role of tumor viruses, oncogenes, tumor suppressors, immortalization, apoptosis, and angiogenesis in cancer initiation and/or progression. Consideration of current therapies and future directions for treatment.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Pre-Requisite(s): BL 3012 or BL 4370 or BE 2400

CEE 3503 - Environmental Engineering

Application of fundamental chemical, biological, and physical principles of environmental engineering to design and operation of systems used for water and wastewater treatment, solid waste management, air pollution control, and analysis of quality of surface water, air, and groundwater.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-3-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Pre-Requisite(s): MA 2160 and CH 1112 or (CH 1150 and CH 1151)

FW 4010 - Public Health and the Environment

Explores how the environment impacts the health of individuals and entire populations. Topics will include exposure to environmental hazards and natural disasters, access to green and blue space and the built environment.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (2-1-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman, Sophomore

HU 4625 - Risk Communication

Examines models for communicating risks associated with environmental, safety, and health hazards. Considers the diverse roles assumed by the public under each of these models and means of ensuring that risks are communicated fairly, honestly, and accurately.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-3-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman, Sophomore
  • Pre-Requisite(s): UN 1015 and (UN 1025 or Modern Language - 3000 level or higher)

KIP 2600 - Introduction to Public Health

An overview of public health including the history of public health and major issues facing the U.S. and global populations. Topics include societal conditions that lead to health disparities, role of government, and the basic sciences supporting public health.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall

KIP 3700 - Lifetime Fitness

To gain a thorough understanding in all areas of personal fitness through functional anatomy, exercise physiology, health and physical fitness, screening and evaluation, nutrition, weight management, exercise prescription and programming considerations, training instruction, and consideration for special populations.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (2-0-2)
  • Semesters Offered: Summer

KIP 4740 - Epidemiology

An introduction to the principles and methods of epidemiology to understand the distribution and determinants of health in a population. Topics include basic epidemiological statistics, study design, and sources/impact of bias and error.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring

MA 3715 - Biostatistics

Introduction to the design and analysis of statistical studies in the health and life sciences. Topics include study design, descriptive and graphical methods, probability, inference on means, categorical data analysis, and linear regression.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-3-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Pre-Requisite(s): MA 1135 or MA 1160 or MA 1161

MA 3740 - Statistical Programming and Analysis

Project-based course enabling students to identify statistical methods and analysis using R and SAS. Topics include exploratory data analysis, classical statistical tests, sample size and power considerations, correlation, regression,and design experiments using advanced programming techniques.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-2-2)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
  • Pre-Requisite(s): MA 2710 or MA 2720 or MA 3710 or MA 3715

MA 4710 - Regression Analysis

Covers simple, multiple, and polynomial regression; estimation, testing, and prediction; weighted least squares, matrix approach, dummy variables, multicollinearity, model diagnostics and variable selection. A statistical computing package is an integral part of the course.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-3-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall
  • Pre-Requisite(s): MA 2710 or MA 2720 or MA 3710 or MA 3715 or MA 5701

MKT 3000 - Principles of Marketing

Emphasizes decisions made in developing both strategic and tactical marketing plans. Uses computer simulations, experiential learning assignments, and marketing plan development to demonstrate principles of market segmentation, product development, pricing, distribution planning, and promotion.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

SAT 4424 - Population Health Management and Monitoring

Introduces organization context of health data for the use of managing populations. Types of health data sources, interventions, data analytics, and policy factors affecting population health are covered. Also explores how information is used for managing population health surveillance.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-2-2)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman, Sophomore
  • Pre-Requisite(s): SAT 4422 or BL 2010 or BL 3080 or EH 1500 or KIP 1500 or SAT 5121

SS 3750 - Social Inequality

A critical assessment of social and cultural processes associated with group-based or categorical patterns of inequality. Examines the creation, persistence, and attempts at reduction of structured inequality based on categorical factors such as social class, race, ethnicity, and gender. May explore other significant sources of social inequality.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall - Offered alternate years beginning with the 2017-2018 academic year
  • Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman
  • Pre-Requisite(s): UN 1015 and (UN 1025 or Modern Language - 3000 level or higher)

Elective Coursework (5-6 credits)

Students select an additional 5-6 credit hours from these course or additional courses above.

BE 2110 - Statistical Methods for Biomedical Engineering

Topics include descriptive statistics, sampling methods, probability, statistical inference, causality, elementary design of experiments, statistical process improvement methods including Six-Sigma techniques, clinical trial methodology, and variance analysis.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Pre-Requisite(s): MA 1135 or MA 1160 or MA 1161

BL 2940 - Human Nutrition

Covers basic and applied chemistry and biology of human nutrition. Includes practical information on planning and adopting a healthy diet as well as maintaining acceptable weight. Emphasizes social, global, and environmental issues pertinent to use of the world food supply.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring, Summer
  • Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman

BL 3220 - Medical Mycology and Virology

Study of clinically important fungi and viruses.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s): Medical Laboratory Science, Biological Sciences; May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman, Sophomore
  • Pre-Requisite(s): BL 3210

BL 3780 - Medical Parasitology Laboratory

Stresses the visual identification of common human parasites.

  • Credits: 1.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-0-3)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s): Medical Laboratory Science, Biological Sciences; May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman
  • Pre-Requisite(s): BL 1710 and BL 2410

BL 4038 - Epigenetics

An introduction to the fundamentals of epigenetic control that is not encoded by genomic DNA sequences of an organism. Topics include major regulatory mechanisms including DNA methylation, histone modification, and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) mediated gene regulation.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman, Sophomore
  • Pre-Requisite(s): BL 3300 or BL 4030

BL 4070 - Environmental Toxicology

Introduction to the range of anthropogenic pollutants released into the environment. Concepts of bioaccumulation, biomagnification and environmental persistence, modes of toxicity and detoxification, transport and fate in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Toxic equivalent factors and quotients, regulatory guidelines and practices.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman, Sophomore
  • Pre-Requisite(s): (BL 1020 or BL 1040) and CH 1150 and CH 1160

CEE 4503 - Drinking Water Treatment Principles and Design

Provides an overview of the principles and design of municipal water treatment practices. Understand the physical and chemical processes employed in water treatment. Design individual unit processes with a view toward integration into complete treatment systems.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Pre-Requisite(s): CEE 3501 or CEE 3503

CEE 4993 - Engineering with Developing Communities

Study of applying appropriate, community-based, and sustainable engineering in developing communities. Concepts of human-centered design and sustainable development are covered. Topics are drawn from several areas of engineering, including water and wastewater treatment, construction materials, solid waste, energy, and information systems.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (2-1-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall
  • Pre-Requisite(s): (ENG 2120 or MEEM 2150) and (BE 3350 or CM 2120 or ENG 3200 or MEEM 3201)

CEE 4502 - Wastewater Treatment Principles and Design

Principles of physical, chemical, and biological processes employed in wastewater treatment. Design of selected individual units within wastewater treatment systems.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall
  • Pre-Requisite(s): CEE 3501 or CEE 3503

CEE 4504 - Air Quality Engineering and Science

Overview of air quality regulation in the U.S. and world, including basic concepts of atmospheric chemistry and transport; fugitive, point, and area emissions; principles and tradeoffs of operation and design of air pollution control systems; and application of air quality models.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-3-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall
  • Pre-Requisite(s): CEE 3501 or CEE 3503

HU 3261 - Topics in Communicating Across Cultures

Examines communication practices and styles across selected cultures and multicultural groups, drawing on an interdisciplinary range of research fields. May address social issues, language and cultural differences, gender, race, ethnicity, class, disabilities, age, religion, family and national identity.

  • Credits: 3.0; Repeatable to a Max of 6
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-3-0)
  • Semesters Offered: On Demand
  • Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman
  • Pre-Requisite(s): UN 1015 and (UN 1025 or Modern Language - 3000 level or higher)

HU 4711 - Biomedical Research Ethics

Examination of bioethical issues in biomedical research. Topics include research on human subjects, on vulnerable populations, and animals, principles of ethical research, and societal expectations for researchers.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: On Demand - Offered alternate years beginning with the 2018-2019 academic year
  • Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Junior, Senior
  • Pre-Requisite(s): HU 3711

KIP 3000 - Sports Psychology

Overview of psychological principles and their applications to individuals and groups in sport, exercise and/or therapy. For the laboratory portion, students observe and analyze behaviors in a setting of their choice.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (2-0-1)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • Pre-Requisite(s): PSY 2000

MA 2720 - Statistical Methods

Introduction to the design and analysis of statistical studies. Topics include methods of data collection, descriptive and graphical methods, probability, statistical inference on means, regression and correlation, and ANOVA.

  • Credits: 4.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-4-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Major(s): Mathematics
  • Pre-Requisite(s): MA 1020 or MA 1030 or ALEKS Math Placement >= 61 or CEEB Calculus BC >= 2 or CEEB Calculus AB Subscore >= 2 or ACT Mathematics >= 22 or SAT MATH SECTION SCORE-M16 >= 540

PSY 2200 - Behavior Modification

An introduction to techniques of behavior modification through the application of learning theories such as classical and operant conditioning. Students will conduct a case study project designed to modify and assess a personal behavior.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-3-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall - Offered alternate years beginning with the 2018-2019 academic year
  • Pre-Requisite(s): PSY 2000

PSY 2400 - Health Psychology

Examines the theoretical, empirical, and historical bases for health psychology. Topics may include the effects of stress, determinants of addictive behavior, the impact of psychological factors on physical health, obesity, and the causes and treatment of chronic pain.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-3-0)
  • Semesters Offered: On Demand
  • Pre-Requisite(s): PSY 2000

PSY 2720 - Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

An understanding of statistical concepts and ability to conduct statistical analyses (using both hand calculation and SPSS) as used in Social and Behavioral Sciences research. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation, and inferential statistics through ANOVA.

  • Credits: 4.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-3-3)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s): Social Sciences, Psychology
  • Pre-Requisite(s): MA 1031 or MA 1032 or MA 1160(C) or MA 1161(C) or MA 1135(C)

PSY 2800 - Critical Thinking for Social and Behavioral Sciences

This course will help develop critical thinking skills central to the social and behavioral sciences. Topics may include arguments, logic, evaluating causal claims, evaluating surveys, theory evaluation, experiment evaluation, writing in psychology, and ethical considerations in the social and behavioral sciences.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring
  • Pre-Requisite(s): PSY 2000(C)

PSY 3070 - Cross-Cultural Psychology

Introduces the student to cross cultural psychology and sociocultural theory as it is applied to psychology. Examines research on cultural specific and universal behaviors. Emphasizes the benefits and challenges of diversity in organizations and diversity skills that promote interpersonal and organizational success.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-3-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall - Offered alternate years beginning with the 2019-2020 academic year
  • Pre-Requisite(s): PSY 2000 and UN 1015 and (UN 1025 or Modern Language - 3000 level or higher)

PSY 4750 - Judgement and Decision Making

How can we make better decisions? Using examples from medicine, politics, law, business, and daily life, we review "descriptive" (psychological), "normative" (rational), and "prescriptive" (decision-engineering) theory. Topics include judgment, cognition, emotion, risk, uncertainty, heuristics, biases, and applications.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (0-3-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Spring - Offered alternate years beginning with the 2018-2019 academic year
  • Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman
  • Pre-Requisite(s): PSY 2000

SS 2050 - Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems and Technologies

Introduction to geospatial sciences and technologies that are widely used for mapping and analyzing geographic patterns of human activities. Students gain hands-on experience in data collection, spatial data editing, georeferencing, spatial analysis, cartography, and spatial problem solving.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (1-0-2)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall

SS 3105 - Native American and Indigenous Communities

Exploration of contemporary Native American and Indigenous communities worldwide, using a cross-cultural and comparative approach, with some historical context. Topics examined include the legacy of settler colonialism, issues facing Indigenous communities today, and Indigenous renewal and resistance, with emphasis on Native North America.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: On Demand
  • Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman
  • Pre-Requisite(s): UN 1015 and (UN 1025 or Modern Language - 3000 level or higher)

SS 3300 - Environmental Problems

An examination of local, regional, and global contemporary environmental problems. Critical consideration of underlying social, historical, and economic causes. Case studies drawn from topics such as global warming, ozone depletion, groundwater pollution, solid waste disposal, deforestation, and resource depletion. Studies proposed solutions and their impacts.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: On Demand
  • Pre-Requisite(s): UN 1015 and (UN 1025 or Modern Language - 3000 level or higher)

SS 3315 - Population and Environment

This course investigates relationships between the world's population, population change, population distribution, resource consumption, and environmental and social consequences. Addresses local and global relationships and the population processes (mortality, fertility, and migration) involved.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall, Summer - Offered alternate years beginning with the 2019-2020 academic year
  • Restrictions: May not be enrolled in one of the following Class(es): Freshman
  • Pre-Requisite(s): (MA 1030 and MA 1031) or MA 1032 and UN 1015 and (UN 1025 or Modern Language - 3000 level or higher)

SS 3621 - Introduction to Public Policy and Public Management

Key public policy and public management concepts are introduced and applied to the student's field of interest.

  • Credits: 3.0
  • Lec-Rec-Lab: (3-0-0)
  • Semesters Offered: Fall - Offered alternate years beginning with the 2017-2018 academic year
  • Pre-Requisite(s): UN 1015 and (UN 1025 or Modern Language - 3000 level or higher)

Learning Objectives

Upon successful completion of the Public Heath minor, students will be able to:

  1. Apply a public health approach to identify and address complex health needs in populations
  2. Assess the biologic, social, behavioral, cultural, political, and environmental factors that promote or inhibit health equity in populations.
  3. Apply ethical principles of research and public health to the design or evaluation of existing or proposed public health programs, policies, or interventions.
  4. Demonstrate the interdisciplinary nature of public health by examining the contributions of different disciplines (including the student’s chosen major field) to protect and improve the health of global or domestic populations.