2017 Michigan Tech Research Magazine

  • Michigan Tech physics professor John Jaszczak worked with researchers from around
      the world to identify merelaniite. In time, a better understanding of its chemistry
      may reveal useful applications.

    Meet the Minerals

    Don't judge a mineral by its cover. Because that fine, hair-like coating might turn out to be a new mineral. At least that was the case with the newly named merelaniite, a cylindrite-group mineral discovered by a team of researchers led by John Jaszczak, a professor of physics at Michigan Tech. The tiny gray whiskers of merelaniite had been around a while, but had probably been regularly cleaned off larger, better-known crystals like the gemstone tanzanite. The name of the new mineral was chosen by Jaszczak and his colleagues after the township of Mererani, known more commonly in the mineral and gemological communities as "Merelani," in honor of the local miners working in the nearby tanzanite gem mines in northern Tanzania where the new mineral occurs.

On the cover: Merelaniite a New Mineral Debuts


Research is published by University Marketing and Communications and the Vice President for Research Office at Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, Michigan 49931-1295.

David Reed—Vice President for Research

Cathy Jenich—Assistant to Vice President for Research

John Lehman—Associate Vice President for Enrollment, Marketing, and Communications

Ian Repp—Director of University Marketing and Communications

Crystal Verran—Director of Operations

Scott Balyo—Editorial Director

Jackie Johnson—Art Director

Jennifer Donovan, Marcia Goodrich, Kaye LaFond, Allison Mills, Stefanie Sidortsova—Writers

Jordan Blahnik, Vassilissa Semouchkina—Designers

Sarah Bird—University Photographer

Eric Bronson—Freelance Photographer

Ben Jaszczak—Multimedia Specialist

Megan Ross—Digital Services Coordinator

Comments to the editor
magazine@mtu.edu

Address changes
gccolaro@mtu.edu

Learn more about research at Michigan Tech online.