Climate and Energy

Michigan Tech is committed to continuous reduction of our carbon footprint and energy use. We will achieve this through a three-pronged approach: improving the energy efficiency of existing buildings, minimizing the energy demand in any new construction or major remodeling projects, and greening the sources of our energy through increasing renewable energy production and contracting for high-quality utility-provided renewable energy credits.

  • 50%
    of MTU's purchased energy is from renewable wind power through 2025.
  • $3.6M
    savings in energy expenditures over the life of our current wind power contract..
  • 18M
    kilowatt-hours of annual green power used.
  • 25%
    decrease in campus carbon footprint from 2016 to 2021.

In 2023, Michigan Tech launched the Evergreen Energy Fund to tackle projects that improve energy efficiency in our buildings. Example projects include installing LED lighting and controls, improving insulation, and updating HVAC systems. Staff will measure the cost savings resulting from those projects, and a portion of the savings will return to the fund to pay for future projects. This “revolving” fund will lead to substantial cost savings and greenhouse gas emissions reductions: we anticipate reducing our carbon footprint by 8% and our annual utilities bill by 13% by 2035, resulting in over $5M in cumulative utility costs savings at current prices.

Solar Panels on Campus

Find more information on MTU's Energy Management Strategies below:

Blue diagram with a yellow inverted triangle that places a hierarchy on avoiding and minimizing energy demand, followed by reducing energy inefficiency, followed by substituting with better energy alternatives, and lastly followed by compensation through carbon offsets.

Emissions Reduction Hierarchy: From Most Favored to Least Favored1

  1. Avoid: Minimize Energy Demand in New Construction
  2. Reduce: Increase efficiency of current activities
  3. Substitute: Lower-carbon fuel and energy sources
  4. Compensate: Purchase and practice carbon offsets 

1Blue diagram with a yellow inverted triangle that places a hierarchy on avoiding and minimizing energy demand, followed by reducing energy inefficiency, followed by substituting with better energy alternatives, and lastly followed by compensation through carbon offsets.