Department of Biomedical Engineering

2017-18 Senior Design Projects

Removing Staphylococcus Epidermidis Biofilms from Orthopedic Implants

Team Members
Cassidy Sheffield, Casey Wood, Stephen Marcyan, and Hugh Stanton, Biomedical Engineering

Advisor
Megan Frost, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor
Department of Biomedical Engineering

Project Overview
This is a continuation project that seeks to develop a method for the removal of mature S. Epidermidis biofilms from orthopedic implants due to acute prosthetic joint infections, or PJI’s. PJI’s occur in around 1.5 to 2.5 percent of all primary hip or knee replacement surgeries. This is significant, as these types of infections are very serious, costly to treat, painful, and may result in loss of mobility. In order to solve this problem, the team synthesized and verified a biofilm mimic in order to test various prototypes. The final cleaning methods were then tested on an actual mature (21-day old) biofilm.


Dynamic Heart Model—Anatomical Valves

Team Members
Adam Francis, Chris Haferman, Becca Revett, and Derrick Diver, Biomedical Engineering

Advisors
Feng Zhao and Bruce Lee, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor
Boston Scientific

Project Overview
Human anatomical heart models can be used to aid in the development and testing of new medical devices. Current models of the heart are primarily static and are limited in many physiological factors. Our objective is to develop a dynamic, anatomically correct heart model where the heart valves open at true physiological values. The model will also have a physiological pressure flow loop of fluid, and accurate ventricular deformation. Ideally, this dynamic model will allow for physicians to train using new surgical techniques and devices at no risk to patients or animals.


Transcatheter Single Ventricle Device for Treatment of Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

Team Members
Cal Riutta, Marie Wendling, Jennifer Hannon, and Grace Carey, Biomedical Engineering

Advisors
Smitha Rao and Jeremy Goldman, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor
Spectrum Health Innovations—Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital

Project Overview
Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS) is a congenital heart defect where the left side of the heart is critically underdeveloped, leading to fatality within weeks of birth. One surgical treatment uses stenting and minimally invasive surgery to control blood flow in the pulmonary system, preparing the infant for open heart surgery three months later. The Transcatheter Single Ventricle Device (TSVD) aims to replace these two procedures with a single catheterization approach. A modified stent with a polymer coating is being developed. This project, now in its third year, is aimed at testing the polymers for use with the stent. Challenges include the small size of the stent (5 Fr), hemocompatibility, and the biocompatibility and mechanical strength of the polymers.


Nerve Stimulation through Powered Surgical Instruments: Cerebral Ultrasonic Aspiration

First Place Design Expo Innovation Award

Team Members
Peter Beach, Sterling Korstad, Ana-Lisia Powdhar, Matthew Sampson, and Rachel Stites, Biomedical Engineering

Advisor
Orhan Soykan, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor
Stryker Instruments

Project Overview
The objectives of our project are to conceptualize, design, prototype, and test a modification of Stryker Instruments’ Sonopet ultrasonic handpiece. Currently, one of the main uses for the handpiece is for the removal of malignant tissues in the brain. During these operations, the surgeon must periodically switch from the handpiece to a nerve monitoring probe that reports the proximity of the operation to the major cranial nerves. Our modification combines the functionality of these two devices, eliminating the need for surgeons to switch instruments mid-surgery, reducing the probability of injury from repeated insertion and removal of the devices.


Development of a Novel Blubber-Only Satellite Telemetry Tag for Humpback Whale Conservation

Second Place Design Expo Innovation Award

Team Members
Ariana Tyo, Reis Jones, Monica Nelson, Elizabeth Bloch, and Alex Undlin, Biomedical Engineering

Advisor
Rupak Rajachar, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsors
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI)

Project Overview
Satellite telemetry tags are used by marine biologists and conservationists to track the migration patterns of whales in an effort to improve conservation practices. Current long-term tracking tags used in the field have a low retention rate, despite using a variety of anchors (e.g. barbs, petals, and other mechanical retention techniques) deployed in the blubber-muscle interface after penetration. Our team is working to improve biocompatibility through a tag redesign, therefore increasing retention. This will be done by creating a blubber-only tag with the capability of releasing an adhesive hydrogel as well as utilizing novel retention techniques.


Enhanced Measurement and Analysis of Gait Disturbances

Team Members
Jennie Baker, Rebecca Bostwick, and Hannah Cunningham, Biomedical Engineering

Advisors
Bruce Lee and Orhan Soykan, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor
Aspirus Keweenaw

Project Overview
Our project aims to reduce the amount of time it takes patients to recover from hip and knee orthopedic surgeries. Physical therapy visits only happen once or twice a week, so most of the recovery process relies on patients performing assigned exercises without supervision at home. Our device would provide patients with corrective feedback while they perform exercises in their homes. As the second team working on this project, we chose to focus on three areas of improvement: determining the device’s ability to detect gait abnormalities by comparing it to another gait analysis system, developing a prototype to increase ease of use, and improving the therapist interface so the data can be better interpreted.


Medtronic Multi-coil Passive Recharging Prototype Device

Team Members
Holly Eyrich, Ken Hubbard, and Zachary Vanderstelt, Biomedical Engineering
Jacob Carley, Electrical Engineering

Advisors
Keat Ghee Ong and Sean Kirkpatrick, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor
Medtronic

Project Overview
In order to treat chronic pain, nerve-stimulating implants can be surgically implanted into the upper-buttock to stimulate the patient’s spinal cord to relieve pain. These implants require wireless inductive coupling in order to maintain their power. The current charging system requires the user’s full attention throughout a charging session to ensure that the charging coil is aligned with their implant. The goal of this project is to create a working prototype capable of recharging implants at depths of 1-3 cm below the surface of the patient’s skin that requires minimal readjustments on the patient’s part. To reduce readjustments, a coil array is used for charging instead of a single coil.


Diagnostic Instrumentation for Manual Medical Devices—Phase II

Team Members
Bruce Brunson Jr., Ryan Root, and Tanner Viegut, Biomedical Engineering; Jordan Horan, Electrical Engineering

Advisors
Jeremy Goldman and Keat Ghee Ong, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor
Boston Scientific

Project Overview
Coronary heart disease causes plaque buildup around the heart and is one of the leading medical problems in the United States. The use of a guidewire and catheter allows physicians access to the affected sites, thus allowing treatment wherever the plaque may build up. Despite the importance of the practice, there are not enough tools that give feedback to the physician as they navigate the guidewire through the vessels. Our team is building upon the work done by last year’s team by updating the model to be more user friendly, fleshing out the feedback program, and fitting the device with sensors to measure torque.


Rapid Prototyping of Ultrasound Elastography Phantom for Breast Cancer Detection

Third Place Design Expo Innovation Award

Team Members
Collin Gauthier, David Ross, Shallen Gurtler, and Alex Prucha, Biomedical Engineering

Advisor
Jingfeng Jiang, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor
Materialise

Project Overview
Ultrasound elastography is a technique used in tandem with classical diagnostics in order to increase the likelihood of breast cancer detection, especially in dense tissue which can mask the tumors against palpation and mammography identification. Phantoms, specially designed objects, are used to calibrate ultrasound elastography devices and train technicians; however current phantoms are costly, and can be high-maintenance. Additionally, as a result of manufacturing difficulties, these phantoms often lack the complexity to properly represent the native tissue structures and challenge ultrasound elastography machines. This project aims to further the progress made by previous teams by using a PVC material, compatible with additive manufacturing, to create a high fidelity, molded, ultrasound elastography phantom.