Sajjad Bigham

Sajjad Bigham

Contact

  • Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics
  • PhD, Mechanical Engineering, University of Florida

Biography

Dr. Sajjad Bigham is an assistant professor in the Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics Department at Michigan Technological University since 2016. He received his Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from University of Florida in 2016. He is the director of the EnergyX Lab (Energy Exploration Laboratory) at Michigan Tech.

Dr. Bigham is a heat transfer and energy systems specialist interested in scientific and engineering challenges that lay at the intersection of thermal-fluid, material and energy sciences. Our lab, EnergyX, is focused on understanding the fundamental transport science of important energy carriers at micro, nano and molecular scales. We designs, fabricates and examines a wide range of meso-, micro- and nano-devices/systems to understand their underlying physics and explore new technologies and performance breakthroughs.

EnergyX mission: EnergyX is a research group that specializes in energy science and technology. The increasing global demand for energy has stimulated intense research on energy conversion and storage systems. The mission of our lab is to improve energy efficiency, reliability, and economy of the process, component or system X; with X being our target technological area which spans from the energy sector to defense and environmental applications.

Links of Interest

Areas of Expertise

  • Heat Transfer and Thermal Management
  • Multiphase Flows and Phase-change Phenomena
  • Energy Systems
  • Micro- and Nano-fabrication Techniques

Research Interests

  • Microscale Heat Transfer
  • Microscale Physics of Boiling and Condensation Heat Transfer
  • Interfacial Transport Phenomena at Extreme Temperatures and Pressures
  • Multiphase Systems under Harsh Operating Conditions
  • HVAC&R Systems
  • Desalination Systems
  • Micro- and Nano-engineered Materials
  • Energy Conversion and Storage Devices