Beyond Learning

Chemical engineering students at Michigan Tech do more than just study this extensive field; they graduate with a unique set of skills gleaned from hands-on lab experience and competitive course work. The Department of Chemical Engineering has one of the most expansive learning laboratories in the discipline worldwide—measuring in at 6,500 square feet, the Unit Operations Lab is a pilot-plant-scale educational facility dedicated to chemical processing. Combined with world-class faculty, this program ensures our students are prepared to succeed in industry and beyond.


Chemical Engineering Speakers on Vimeo
William Colton, VP Exxon Mobil
Energy Future: The Outlook for Energy: A View to 2040

Faculty Focus More Faculty

Tomas B. Co

Tomas B. Co

PhD, University of Massachusetts

Contact

906-487-2144
tbco@mtu.edu

Associate Professor, Chemical Engineering

I am interested in advanced control strategies and algorithms including the application of artificial intelligence to process control

Process Integrity

As systems undergo operational changes due to equipment degradation, market demands, and other external disturbances, some processes approach failure conditions. To provide appropriate actions to prevent failure, predictive monitoring and control are needed. To this end, we . . .

Faculty Focus More Faculty

David R. Shonnard

David R. Shonnard

Contact

906-487-3468
drshonna@mtu.edu

Professor, Chemical Engineering

Research interests are in the areas of sustainability, life-cycle environmental assessments, environmental transport processes, and forest-based biofuels.

Life Cycle Assessment/Sustainability
Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a method that allows for a comprehensive assessment of environmental impacts for a product or process. The scope of the assessment is over the entire life cycle; starting with extraction of . . .

Faculty Focus More Faculty

Michael E. Mullins

Michael E. Mullins

PhD, University of Rochester

Contact

906-487-1445
memullin@mtu.edu

Professor, Chemical Engineering

Ceramics, fine particles, and engineered nanostructures

In the area of ceramics and particle technology, we are learning to make novel nanoscale structures for use as electrodes, catalysts, biomaterials, and membranes. Specific current research includes the development of polymer/inorganic nanofibers for tissue scaffolds, electrosynthesis of new hybrid materials, porous carbon electrodes for battery and fuel . . .