Michigan Tech News

Research

Isle Royale wolves trek through the snow.

Inbred Wolves Struggle, Moose Proliferate at Isle Royale National Park

April 30, 2014
By Jennifer Donovan

The 2013-14 annual report on Michigan Tech's wolf-moose predator-prey study at Isle Royale National Park shows that inbreeding is posing a threat to the continued existence of the wolves, while, with numbers of wolves decreasing, the moose population has doubled.

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Xiaodi

Lifting the Brakes on Fuel Efficiency

April 17, 2014
By Zachary Dubiel

Faculty scientist's innovative brake design is attracting attention around the world. 

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Mo Rastgaar with the prosthetic limb that he hopes will provide amputees with greater mobility and agility.

Rastgaar Receives CAREER Award to Develop Ankle-Foot Prosthetic Robot

April 9, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

A new prosthetic to help amputees walk more naturally

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The GLRC's under-ice observatory was manufactured from repurposed instruments and materials.

What's Going On Under the Ice? A Cabled Observatory Gives Michigan Tech Researchers a Peek

April 2, 2014
By Jennifer Donovan

An under-ice observatory at the Great Lakes Research Center is providing a rare view of what goes on under water during the long UP winters.

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Michigan Tech scientists have pinpointed genes that could be key in the development of hardy, disease-resistant grains, including rice.

Scientists ID Genes that Could Lead to Tough, Disease-Resistant Varieties of Rice

March 31, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

A possible key to developing super grains for a hungry world

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This sign that says

Payments to Upstream Landowners to Protect Water Downstream: How Well is that Working

March 13, 2014
By Jennifer Donovan

Michigan Tech researchers are studying Mexico's system of paying landowners to preserve forested land to protect the quality of water for communities downstream.

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Maize plants grown in stamp sand inoculated with bacteria, left, were considerably more robust than those grown in stamp sand alone, right. This research could lead to new remediation techniques for soils contaminated by copper and other heavy metals.

Maize Plus Bacteria: One-Two Punch Knocks Copper Out of Stamp Sand

March 5, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

Toward a simple, practical way to clean up mine waste . . . and better understand the biochemical pathways at its heart

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A hydrogel treated with dopamine and iron ions is flat under neutral conditions (top photo) and bends in an alkaline state. Michigan Tech's Bruce P. Lee borrowed chemistry found in the adhesive proteins of mussels, left, to make his hydrogel actuator.

Pumping Iron: A Hydrogel Actuator with Mussel Tone

March 5, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

Using chemistry inspired by the proteins in a certain mollusk, Michigan Tech's Bruce P. Lee has developed a hydrogel that moves when its pH is raised.

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Joshua Pearce holds a DremelFuge chuck made from shredded plastic milk jugs.

Save Money and the Planet: Turn Your Old Milk Jugs into 3D Printer Filament

March 4, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

Life-cycle analysis shows energy savings of up to 90 percent.

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end of life

What do We do Now? Family Members and the Brain Dead

February 25, 2014
By Dennis Walikainen

Humanities professor researches ethical decisions at end of life.

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