Michigan Tech News

Research

Carol MacLennan's new book traces how the rise and fall of the sugar planter elite inflicted profound environmental and social changes upon Hawai'i and its people.

A Bittersweet Legacy: Carol MacLennan Documents the Rise and Fall of Sugar in Hawai’i

September 24, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

Sugar brought high profits and good jobs to Hawai'i, but at a price.

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Researchers can save thousands of dollars and slash the time it takes to complete experiments by printing parts for their own custom-designed syringe pumps. Joshua Pearce's lab made this web-enabled double syringe pump for less than $160. Emily Hunt photo

Science Just Got Cheaper (and Faster): Design Library Lets Researchers Print their Own Syringe Pumps

September 17, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

Researchers can now make their own customized syringe pumps for pennies on the dollar using free designs and a 3D printer.

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MTRI Demos Uses for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Transportation

September 4, 2014
By Jennifer Donovan

The Michigan Tech Research Institute is demonstrating its family of unmanned aerial vehicles at the Intelligent Transportation Systems World Congress in Detroit.

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Michigan Tech's new transmission electron microscope will be able to generate images such as this one, which reveals the atomic structure of zinc-antimony nanowires.

Michigan Tech Receives NSF Grant for Transmission Electron Microscope

August 26, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

Will let researchers capture images at the atomic level and detect the chemical composition of atoms

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Michigan Tech biochemist Tarun Dam with a solution containing lectin, used to study how an important class of biomolecules react in the body. Sarah Bird photo

Breakthrough Understanding of Biomolecules Could Lead to New and Better Drugs

August 22, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

Conventional wisdom says that the scaffold in an important class of biological molecules called glycoconjugates is essentially inert. Work led by Michigan Tech chemist Tarun Dam suggests otherwise.

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Nanoscale integrated circuits are so complex that software used by computer chip designers hasn't kept up with the hardware. Zhuo Feng hopes to remedy that with a $400,000 NSF CAREER Award. Wikimedia Commons image by Antoinebercovici

Zhuo Feng Gets CAREER Award to Develop New Tools for Nanoscale Computer Chip Design

August 5, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

With tens of billions of transistors on a single chip, design software is having trouble keeping up with the hardware. Feng hopes to change that.

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Just as kinetic energy can move through pendulums, scientists have shown that light energy can be transferred from one waveguide to another by applying the mysterious concept of supersymmetry. Thinkstock image

A Little Light Magic

July 29, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

An optical twist to a puzzle of particle physics could lead to innovations in applications as varied as lasers and high-speed data transmission.

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Guiliang Tang aims to decode the genetics of food crops, leading to more productive, disease-resistant varieties. Thinkstock photo

Tang Receives $2.5 Million Grant to Enhance Knowledge of Crop Genetics

July 11, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

A step toward tougher plants and bigger harvests,

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Tolou Shokuhfar

Study of Key Biomolecule Earns Tolou Shokuhfar CAREER Award

July 1, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

Her new technique lets her observe ferritin's behavior  at the atomic level and gain insight into how it malfunctions and causes disease.

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Before There Was C, There Was N: How Humans Derailed the Nitrogen Cycle and Are Trying to Put It Back on Track

June 27, 2014
By Marcia Goodrich

Hugh Gorman's look at humanity's effort to lighten its nitrogen footprint.

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