Michigan Technological University prepares students to create the future.

At Michigan Tech, crazy smart students do. They invent, design, code, create, and compete. Their discoveries make humans healthier and technology smarter. Together with researchers, faculty, and industry partners, Huskies create the future through research—here's how:

  • Print 3-D prosthetic hands from recycled plastic for children in Nicaragua
  • Build Bluetooth bicycle pedals for an improved mountain bike experience
  • Bring down rogue unmanned aerial vehicles with drone catchers
  • Develop cleaner, quieter snowmobiles
  • Test and launch a low-Earth orbit nanosatellite
  • Track predator-prey on Isle Royale

Our mission to create a just, prosperous, and sustainable world is expressed through our entrepreneurial spirit—equal parts curiosity and grit. It infuses everything we do. The lifeblood for an MTU Husky? Battling the North wind, trudging through 200 inches of snow each winter, and staying late in the lab to discover that one, new piece of the puzzle. It's hard work that fuels us.

Michigan Tech's campus in the 1950s
Our campus in the 1950s

Rankings

Michigan Tech's programs earn praise for quality and value—and for safety and quality of life. Recent rankings include:

  • Reader’s Digest: MTU ranked No. 3 Safest Campus in the nation
  • Money Magazine: MTU ranked No. 90 out of 706 Best Colleges
  • Safewise: Houghton/MTU ranked No. 20 on the list of 50 Safest College Towns in America
  • US News & World Report:
    • Undergraduate rankings: No. 118 out of 280 public and private national universities offering undergraduate majors, plus master's and doctoral programs. These colleges also are committed to producing groundbreaking research.
    • Graduate rankings: Environmental Engineering (38), Mechanical Engineering (53), Biomedical Engineering (63), Electrical Engineering (92), and Computer Engineering (95)
  • 5th

    Washington Monthly ranks MTU 5th in nation for its ROTC program

  • 43rd

    BestColleges.com ranks MTU 43rd of best 50 small town colleges in the US

  • 20th

    PayScale.com ranks MTU 20th in nation for mid-career engineering salaries

Academics

We develop, apply, and communicate science, engineering, technology, and mathematics through more than 120 undergraduate and graduate degree programs through seven Colleges and Schools.

  • We turn recycled water bottles into plastic filament, wood scraps into doorknobs, and make hybrid solar energy accessible for Upper Michigan residents.
  • We monitor volcanoes, and work with residents on their slopes to create two-way understanding of socioeconomic and environmental impacts.

Through undergraduate research projects, Enterprise, Senior Design, and the Pavlis Honors College, students learn, build, and do. Michigan Tech creates the future.

Research

Underwater, below snow, on remote mountain peaks and volcano slopes, Michigan Tech research takes us places. It's only natural. Because here on Keweenaw Peninsula—the northernmost point of Innovation Shore—neither classes nor climate come easy.

  • Underwater Robots

  • 3-D Printing

We work across disciplines to investigate dark matter, cloud droplets, gamma rays, industrial archaeological sites, and quantum mechanics. We dig into peat mesocosms. Build and launch nanosatellites. And partner with institutions like NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

  • More than $72 million in research expenditures
  • 126,000 hours of paid undergraduate research last year
  • One-on-one graduate-to-faculty research projects

You can learn more about our research by reading Michigan Tech Research Magazine, Unscripted: Science and Engineering Research, and Michigan Tech News website. Support faculty and student research projects and scholarships through our crowdfunding website, SuperiorIdeas.org.

Student Life

Michigan Tech isn’t on the way to anywhere—and Huskies wouldn't have it any other way. When students aren’t in class or conducting research, they participate in more than 220 student organizations, music and fine arts, and cultural events including the Upper Peninsula of Michigan's largest multicultural festival, the Parade of Nations. Whether it's the All-Nighter frenzy to complete a Winter Carnival snow statue, or chasing the Northern Lights right outside your dorm, there’s a lot to do at MTU.

Our 14 varsity athletic teams includes our NCAA Division I men's ice hockey, NCAA Division II men's and women's sports, and intramurals (fact: one-third of MTU students play in broomball leagues). Go Huskies!

Human Ice Bowling? You have to see it—or do it—to believe it.

Experience Tech’s indoor and outdoor adventures on our very own ski, snowboard, and tubing hill, golf course, hiking and biking trails, recreational forest, and waterways.  

Design, duct-tape, and race a cardboard boat on the Keweenaw Waterway.

Housing and Residence Life offers 2,410 beds in four halls, each with its own personality, 348 apartments, six live-in master's level professionals, more than 70 resident assistants, and an intentional strategy to help Huskies grow and succeed, including theme communities. We're not a suitcase school—students stay here on the weekend.

Greek Life is about friendships, and service to campus and community. More than 20 fraternities and sororities are scholars and leaders on campus.

Bound together by snow and STEM.

There is nothing easy about Michigan Tech—the classes nor climate. Not to worry. Faculty, staff, and peers track student success and offer programs and resources that put Huskies ahead of the pack.


Husky Traditions

Winter Carnival snow statues. Lake Superior waves on K-Day. And home games with the loudest pep band in the nation. In every season, Michigan Tech traditions connect our Husky Family across campus and across generations. Check out the events calendar and plan your visit.

Welcome to Campus

Don't be surprised to see administrators, faculty, and staff carrying your gear up the stairs. Everybody pitches in during Move-in Day. Welcome Week is an opportunity to introduce you to Michigan Tech traditions like broomball—where 2,063 crazy smart students on 240 teams play more than 1,200 games each winter. Local businesses greet students during An Afternoon on the Town—follow College Avenue through Downtown for music, food, prizes, and freebies.

K-Day

K-Day means Keweenaw Day. It’s when classes let out at noon on the Friday before Labor Day and 3,500 students head to the shores of Lake Superior at McLain State Park for food, games, music, and booths by more than 220 student organizations.

Parade of Nations

Michigan Tech hosts the region's largest, oldest multicultural festival, flying the flags of more than 60 countries represented on campus and in our community. Thousands join us in mid-September for international food, entertainment, and family activities promoting global peace and unity.

Family Weekend

In late September or early October, families come up to reconnect with their Husky, meet other families, and experience the Keweenaw Peninsula's fall color season. In addition to arts and athletic events, Family Weekend includes time to explore the area.

Homecoming

It's all about coming back to campus to show Husky Spirit. Besides the Big Game and the King and Queen crowning at Sherman Field, Michigan Tech Homecoming includes cardboard boat races on the Keweenaw Waterway.

Winter Carnival

A Michigan Tech tradition since 1922, winter carnival is in early February. Students band together to celebrate Husky tenacity and 218 inches of annual snowfall. We build snow statues, and compete in ice fishing, human bowling, and snow volleyball. Don’t miss the fireworks show from the top of Michigan Tech's Mont Ripley Ski Hill. Huskies who can't be here keep in touch via our All-Nighter live blog and other feeds like the broomball rink cam.

Spring Fling

Huskies love to play in the snow. But we also welcome sunshine and warmer weather. Spring Fling is a mid-April campus-wide carnival with food, games, and live entertainment.

Campus and Community

Our beautiful campus in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula overlooks the Keweenaw (say "Kee-Wah-Nah") Waterway and is just a few miles from Lake Superior. The area’s waters, forests, and snowfall (218 inches annually) offer skiing, snowboarding, hiking, biking, and paddling opportunities. Historic downtown Houghton is active with locally owned shops, eateries, high-tech companies, music festivals, and parades. We embrace our size, climate, sense of adventure, and originality. Michigan Tech wouldn’t be the same anywhere else on earth—and we wouldn’t have it any other way.

Husky History

Michigan Mining School logo 1885
Michigan Mining School, 1885
Hubbell Hall, Michigan School of Mines
Hubbell Hall
Michigan School of Mines

Michigan Technological University started as the Michigan Mining School in 1885, with a mission to train mining engineers in Upper Michigan's Copper Country. From its roots—four faculty members and 23 students on the second floor of the old Houghton Fire Hall on Montezuma Avenue—Michigan Tech evolved into a leading public research institution. Here's a timeline through the lens of the nine presidents in our 130-year-plus history:

  • Marshman E. Wadsworth, 1887–1898—Student and faculty increase. The School moves to its present location in East Houghton.
  • Fred W. McNair, 1899–1924—Several new buildings and academic programs arise.
  • William Hotchkiss, 1925–1935—The re-named Michigan College of Mining and Technology modernizes, adding programs in chemical, electrical, civil, and mechanical engineering, and forestry.
  • Grover C. Dillman, 1935–1956—The College procures the village of Alberta, Michigan, with its sawmill and 4,000-acre forest, from Ford Motor Company, and adds programs in engineering administration, physics, and geological engineering.
  • J. Robert Van Pelt, 1956–1964—Dormant PhD programs revive. An aggressive research initiative begins. In 1964, the College becomes Michigan Technological University.
  • Raymond L. Smith, 1965–1979—Enrollment expands from 3,400 to more than 7,600. Faculty increases to nearly 300. Growth includes 10 more buildings, new programs, and a sharp increase in research dollars.
  • Dale F. Stein, 1979–1991—Focus on graduate research and University funding goals earn MTU ranking as one of the state’s four nationally recognized research universities.
  • Curtis J. Tompkins, 1991–2004—Tech gains new academic stature, receiving national recognition in US News and World Report and other entities that evaluate and rank universities.
  • Glenn D. Mroz, 2004–Present—Research funding continues to grow, averaging $70 million annually. Eighty-five percent of Tech’s instructional faculty members hold the highest degree in their fields. Enrollment also steadily grows, reaching 7,638 in 2016.

Alumni Notables

Melvin Calvin
Melvin Calvin, 1961 Nobel Prize Winner

Our Michigan Tech Family of more than 70,000 alumni and friends celebrates traditions and creates connections. A few of our notable alumni include:

  • Daniel Branagan—Forbes Magazine recognized this nanotechnology pioneer as one of the important innovators of our time and one of fifteen people who will reinvent the future.
  • Melvin Calvin—won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1961.
  • Charlotte Field—the senior vice president of National Communications Engineering and Operations for Comcast Cable won the 2005 Women in Technology Award.
  • David Hill—the chief engineer for General Motor is regarded as “the father” of the groundbreaking 2002 Z06 Corvette.
  • David House—he is responsible for Pentium Processor and the “Intel Inside” campaign.
  • Suzanne Jurva—the film credits for this former executive for Steven Spielberg’s DreamWorks Studios and founder of Starcut, Ltd. include Men in Black, Peacemaker (with the world premier in Houghton), and Saving Private Ryan.
  • Charles Nelson—invented paintball.
  • John Opie—he is vice chairman for General Electric, and he and his wife were major supporters of the John and Ruanne Opie Library.
  • Frank Pavlis—the former vice president at Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Fortune 500), recently made a major gift to Michigan Tech and is the namesake of Michigan Tech’s Pavlis Leadership Institute.
  • Dick Robbins—he is one of the most innovative developers of tunneling machinery in the world; his equipment dug the English Chunnel, the tunnel running under the English Channel.
  • Doug Smith—this wildlife biologist leads the Wolf Reintroduction Program at Yellowstone National Park.
  • Lina T. Taskovich—has made significant contributions to the development of drug “patches,” gaining recognition in Newsweek and People.

Relocation Resources

Thinking of Relocating to the Keweenaw?

Michigan Technological University is located in Houghton. Of the 30 safest college towns in America, Safewise says Michigan Tech is No. 19. The area is home to 12,000 residents, and active with locally owned shops, eateries, high-tech companies, music festivals, and parades. Faculty, students, staff, and the community enjoy the University-owned ski, snowboard, and tubing hill, golf course, and recreation trails, and other outdoor adventure opportunities the Keweenaw Peninsula offers.