2013-14 Senior Design Projects

Continuous Temperature Monitoring at Aspirus Keweenaw

Continuous Temperature Monitoring at Aspirus Keweenaw

Team Members

Brett Barker, John Cieslewicz, Matthew Clisch, Corinne Green, Joseph Kovach, and Jack Lubinski, Biomedical Engineering

Advisor

Keat Ghee Ong, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor

Aspirus Keweenaw

Project Overview

Our team is working with Aspirus Keweenaw to implement a system to automatically and continuously monitor temperatures and humidity in hospital labs and equipment in order to decrease labor costs and the unnecessary loss of reagents and materials. The system must notify appropriate personnel when temperatures are too far out of range to limit the amount of reagents needing to be discarded.


Delivery Tool for a Leadless Pacemaker

Delivery Tool for a Leadless Pacemaker

Team Members

Emily Helminen, Samantha Hilliger, Daniel Leppek, Cody Mingo, Tyler Myers, and Anna Ylitalo, Biomedical Engineering

Advisor

Rupak Rajachar, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor

Medtronic Inc.

Project Overview

The design problem presented by Medtronic consists of modifying a delivery tool currently used during the deployment of the Micra leadless pacemaker. The modified tool must satisfy two independent functional requirements: 1.) guide the device catheter through the atrium and ventricle and 2.) unsheath the pacemaker to expose the implantation tines.


Fixation of a Cardiac Leadless Pacemaker

Fixation of a Cardiac Leadless Pacemaker

Team Members

Jacob Bjorn, Ethan Holley, William Weiner, Alyssa Hartman, Laura Lynch, and Rachel Morrison, Biomedical Engineering

Advisor

Jingfeng Jiang, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor

Boston Scientific

Project Overview

Boston Scientific tasked our team with designing, building, and testing a fixation mechanism for a leadless pacing device. This wireless pacemaker is to be attached on the interior endocardial surface of the right ventricle of the heart. The mechanism must stay fixated without risking device detachment, which could cause embolization and pulmonary infarction, and it must be removable at the end of the service life. The fixation mechanism can neither add to the diameter of the device nor take up vital space inside the pacemaker that could be used as battery space.


Personal Ultraviolet Radiation Monitor

Personal Ultraviolet Radiation Monitor

Team Members

Neil Momsen, Nicole Westphal, Michael Ramalia, Joseph Frontera, and Bradley Cassiday, Biomedical Engineering

Advisor

Megan Frost and Sean Kirkpatrick, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor

Department of Biomedical Engineering

Project Overview

A senior design team from last year developed a photosensitive patch that tells users when they’ve absorbed the amount of radiation that causes sunburn. Our team was tasked with finding a treatment for the patch, which would better simulate the behavior of skin. This treatment is meant to mimic the absorption of sunscreen into skin.


Pro-Healing Arterial Graft Scaffold Design

Pro-Healing Arterial Graft Scaffold Design

Team Members

Steve Trierweiler, David Joda, Danielle Ahrens, and Tyler Curtis, Biomedical Engineering; Chris Heiting and Peter Tropper, Materials Science and Engineering

Advisor

Feng Zhao and Jeremy Goldman, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor

Boston Scientific

Project Overview

This project aims to construct a vascular graft specifically for use in small-diameter arteries. Narrower vasculature generally has harsher conditions, so viable grafts are more difficult to construct. This graft uses decellularized biologic tissue called elastic lamina to induce a nonimmunogenic and nonthrombogenic effect in the body. The elastic lamina layer is supported by a polymer scaffold around its exterior. A variety of polymers were analyzed for biocompatability and sufficient structural properties. The resulting vessel has been tested for mechanical integrity and also implanted in a rat model to test for biological viability.


Sound Level Alarm

Sound Level Alarm

Team Members

Amie Chaloupka, Connor Chrisman, Derek Kohlhase, Andrew Lund, and Shannon Twomey, Biomedical Engineering

Advisor

Michael Neuman, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor

Portage Health

Project Overview

Patients find it difficult to maintain restful sleep while at the hospital due to excessive noise. Previous Senior Design teams have created a device to detect noise levels and produce a visual signal when they have exceeded a predetermined threshold. The design will be evaluated via clinical trials performed at Portage Health. With the information gained from the experiment, we will evaluate the effectiveness of the design in reducing noise levels around patient care areas of the hospital.


Stair Climbing Cane

Stair Climbing Cane

Team Members

Melissa Mack, Travis Neu, Alyssa Hynnek, Caitlyn Privette, and David Rosen, Biomedical Engineering

Advisor

Bruce Lee, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor

Department of Biomedical Engineering

Project Overview

Ascending and descending stairs present a significant stability problem to disabled people. Our team decided to design a cane to help with this problem. Our stair-climbing cane adds two prongs to the normal cane structure so that the cane can be in contact with two steps simultaneously, increasing stability and therefore safety for the user. We performed prototype validation by compressively loading the cane. To demonstrate increased stability, we had human subjects compare the stair-climbing cane and a normal cane on stairs and collected kinematic data from both.


Wearable Heart Rate Monitor

Wearable Heart Rate Monitor

Team Members

Jonathan Mahan, Nils Bergman, Corey Ernst, Kent Daavittila, and Michael Bostwick, Biomedical Engineering

Advisor

Michael Neuman, Biomedical Engineering

Sponsor

Department of Biomedical Engineering

Project Overview

Our team designed a wearable heart-monitoring shirt able to collect, process, transmit, and display cardiographic data on a third-party device.