Kari B. Henquinet

Kari B. Henquinet

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Lecturer, Department of Social Sciences

Director, Peace Corps Master's International Programs

  • PhD, Michigan State University, 2007
  • MA, Anthropology, Michigan State University, 2003
  • BA, Interdisciplinary Studies, Wheaton College, 1996

Biography

My research and teaching interests center around international/transnational development and cultural anthropology. I am currently engaged in two research projects that examine how Americans understand poverty and social problems in the developing world. The first explores the rise of American neo-evangelicalism and how, using the case of World Vision and its founder, neo-evangelical understandings of poverty, modernity, and vulnerability converge and diverge with modernization theory and U.S. foreign aid in the post-WWII period. The second project draws on literature in study abroad, education, global service learning, and anthropology to examine ways in which students experience dissonance in new cultural contexts and develop understandings of culture. I have also conducted ethnographic research in Niger (West Africa) as a Fulbright-Hays scholar that examines translation, reformulation, and rejection of transnational gender and rights-based development interventions.

Areas of Expertise

  • International/transnational development
  • Faith-based development
  • Gender
  • Human rights
  • Global service learning
  • African studies (Niger)

Recent Publications

  • Kari B. Henquinet. 2014. “Reformulating Participation in Nigerien Development Programs: An Examination of Conflicting Messages Concerning Gender and Class.” In Beyond The Boundaries: Toyin Falola and the Art Of Genre-Bending. Nana Amponsah, ed. Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press. Read More
  • Kari Bergstrom Henquinet. 2013. “Translating Women's Rights in Niger: What Happened to the ‘Radical Challenge to Patriarchy?’” In Worlds of Human Rights: The Ambiguities of Rights Claiming in Africa. Bill Derman, Anne Hellum, and Kristin Bergtora Sandvik, eds. Leiden: Brill. Read More
  • Kari Bergstrom Henquinet. 2007. “The Rise of Wife Seclusion in Rural South-Central Niger.” Ethnology 46.1: 57-80.
  • Kari Bergstrom. 2002. “Legacies of Colonialism and Islam for Hausa Women: An Historical Analysis, 1804 to 1960.” WID Working Paper 276. East Lansing, MI: Women and International Development, Michigan State University. Read More

Recent Funding

  • Research Excellence Fund Scholarship & Creativity Grant, Michigan Technological University, Summer and Fall 2012. Principle Investigator. Funded $5300 for field work on project “Evangelicals and Global Poverty after WWII: Bob Pierce‟s Encounters with Global Poverty 1947-1967.”
  • Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Grant, U.S. Department of Education, funded dissertation field research in Niger on “Foreign Aid and Gender in Niger: A Study of Local Interactions with Gender Policies in Transnational Aid Institutions,” 2003-2004.

Presentations

  • 2009 “Neoliberalism, Gender, and Adaptations of Transnational Aid Organizations in Niger.” American Anthropological Association Annual Meetings, Philadelphia, December
  • 2008 “Gender, Neoliberalism, and Adaptations of Transnational Aid Organizations in Niger.” African Studies Association 51st Annual Meeting, Chicago, November
  • 2007 “Translating Gender and Rights in Niger: What Happened to the „Radical Challenge to Patriarchy?‟” American Anthropological Association Annual Meetings, Washington, D.C., November
  • 2013 “Roots of Neo-evangelical Development Institutions and Visions of Modernity: The Case of World Vision (1950-1967).” Society for Applied Anthropology 2013 Annual Meeting, Denver, March

Research Projects

  • “Evangelicals and Global Poverty after WWII: Bob Pierce‟s Encounters with Global Poverty 1947-1967” explores the rise of American neo-evangelicalism and how, using the case of World Vision and its founder, neo-evangelical understandings of poverty, modernity, and vulnerability converge and diverge with modernization theory and U.S. foreign aid in the post-WWII period.
  • “Peace Corps Master’s International Student Cross-Cultural Encounters, Transformative Learning, and Understandings of Culture” draws on literature in study abroad, education, global service learning, and anthropology to examine ways in which Peace Corps students experience dissonance in new cultural contexts and develop understandings of culture. I am interested in when and how their experiences lead to improved understandings of poverty, social problems, and culture, and when these experiences reinforce or enhance ethnocentric views of student-volunteers.
  • “Gender, Rights, Development and Islam: Interfaces with Transnational Aid Organizations in Niger” examines translation, reformulation, and rejection of transnational gender and rights-based development interventions. Using CARE and UNICEF as case studies, I explore how personnel, partners, and aid recipients of these organizations reinforce and challenge social norms and hierarchies through constant negotiations with patriarchy, Islam, "tradition," and multiple conceptions of rights. This research is ethnographic, multi-sited, and in the Hausa and French languages.

Teaching Experience

  • SS 5201 – Cultural Dimensions of International Immersion and Research
  • SS 4030 – Senior Seminar in Anthropology
  • SS 3910 – Histories and Cultures of Africa