The Department of Social Sciences at Michigan Technological University is committed to high-quality undergraduate and graduate instruction across the social sciences. Our interdisciplinary faculty’s areas of expertise include anthropology, environmental and energy policy, history, industrial heritage and archaeology, political science, sociology, and geography. We pride ourselves on providing students with the opportunity to engage in hands-on educational experiences and apply academic concepts, strategies, and techniques to contemporary, real-world issues.

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Kari B. Henquinet

Kari B. Henquinet

PhD, Michigan State University, 2007

Contact

906-487-1843
kbhenqui@mtu.edu

Director, Peace Corps Master's International Programs

Gender, Women’s Rights and Household Livelihoods in Niger

I apply my ethnographic experience and training as a West Africa Area Studies specialist in the study of gender relations and women’s rights by examining prominent transnational aid institutions in Niger.  This research highlights: 1) changes in gender roles and access to resources connected to material and . . .

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Patrick E. Martin

Patrick E. Martin

PhD, Anthropology, Michigan State University, 1984

Contact

906-487-2070
pemartin@mtu.edu

Department Chair, Social Sciences

I am an anthropological archaeologist who has focused my attention on the study of the physical remains of industrialization.  My career at Michigan Tech has involved a combination of field and laboratory research for a wide variety of sponsors with the development of a graduate program in industrial archaeology. In . . .

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Richelle L. Winkler

Richelle L. Winkler

PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2010

Contact

906-487-1886
rwinkler@mtu.edu

Assistant Professor of Sociology and Demography, Social Sciences

My research aims to understand and promote rural community sustainability. Most of my work examines population change as both a cause and a consequence of community well-being, and I am particularly interested in the relationships between population, environment, and community well-being. I employ both quantitative and qualitative research methods to answer . . .