Department of Social Sciences

The Department of Social Sciences at Michigan Technological University is committed to high-quality undergraduate and graduate instruction across the social sciences. Our interdisciplinary faculty’s areas of expertise include anthropology, environmental and energy policy, history, industrial heritage and archaeology, political science, sociology, and geography. We pride ourselves on providing students with the opportunity to engage in hands-on educational experiences and apply academic concepts, strategies, and techniques to contemporary, real-world issues.

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Samuel R. Sweitz

Sam R. Sweitz

PhD, Anthropology, Texas A&M University, 2005

Contact

906-487-1476
srsweitz@mtu.edu

Associate Professor of Anthropology & Archaeology

I am an anthropologically trained archaeologist interested in the impact that the global historical process of industrialization has had on past individuals, societies, and environments and the meaning and relevance of those changes to contemporary people.  I am particularly interested in issues related to the evolving articulations created through

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Carol A. MacLennan

Carol A. MacLennan

PhD, University of California-Berkeley, Anthropology

Contact

906-487-2870
camac@mtu.edu

Professor of Anthropology, Social Sciences

Carol MacLennan, an anthropologist, studies the industrialization of mining and sugar and their environmental and policy consequences for communities and landscapes. She has recently completed a book on her work in Hawai`i titled Sovereign Sugar: Industry and Environment in Hawai`i (University of Hawai`i Press, 2014). She is continuing her

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Steven A. Walton

Steven A. Walton

Ph.D., University of Toronto, 1999

Contact

(906) 487-3272
sawalton@mtu.edu

Associate Professor of History

I began my career as a mechanical engineer and then turned to the history of engineering through the history of science and technology. I am principally interested in the intersection of technology, its users, and the technical knowledge that they claim about it. Much of my work, though chronologically