The Department of Social Sciences at Michigan Technological University is committed to high-quality undergraduate and graduate instruction across the social sciences. Our interdisciplinary faculty’s areas of expertise include anthropology, environmental and energy policy, history, industrial heritage and archaeology, political science, sociology, and geography. We pride ourselves on providing students with the opportunity to engage in hands-on educational experiences and apply academic concepts, strategies, and techniques to contemporary, real-world issues.

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Susanna D. Peters

Susanna D. Peters

JD, University of Pennsylvania, 1990

Contact

906-487-2391
speters@mtu.edu

Lecturer in Law and Society

Susanna Peters, M.S. , J.D., taught at Wayne State University Law School before coming to Michigan Tech. Her research and teaching interests include constitutional law, intellectual property, cyberlaw, and prisons. She attended the University of Pennsylvania Law School and had the opportunity of clerking for United States District/Circuit Court Judge Morris . . .

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Kari B. Henquinet

Kari B. Henquinet

PhD, Michigan State University, 2007

Contact

906-487-1843
kbhenqui@mtu.edu

Lecturer, Department of Social Sciences

My research and teaching interests center around international/transnational development and cultural anthropology. I am currently engaged in two research projects that examine how Americans understand poverty and social problems in the developing world. The first explores the rise of American neo-evangelicalism and how, using the case of World Vision and its . . .

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Richelle L. Winkler

Richelle L. Winkler

PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2010

Contact

906-487-1886
rwinkler@mtu.edu

Assistant Professor of Sociology and Demography, Social Sciences

My research aims to understand and promote rural community sustainability. Most of my work examines population change as both a cause and a consequence of community well-being, and I am particularly interested in the relationships between population, environment, and community well-being. I employ both quantitative and qualitative research methods to answer . . .