The Department of Social Sciences at Michigan Technological University is committed to high-quality undergraduate and graduate instruction across the social sciences. Our interdisciplinary faculty’s areas of expertise include anthropology, environmental and energy policy, history, industrial heritage and archaeology, political science, sociology, and geography. We pride ourselves on providing students with the opportunity to engage in hands-on educational experiences and apply academic concepts, strategies, and techniques to contemporary, real-world issues.

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Mark D. Rouleau

Mark D. Rouleau

PhD, Computational Social Science, George Mason University, 2011

Contact

906-487-2039
mdroulea@mtu.edu

Assistant Professor, Social Sciences

I have extensive interdisciplinary experience using Agent-Based Modeling (ABM) and other computer programming techniques to investigate a wide variety of social science phenomenon. At the University of Delaware, in collaboration with my thesis advisor, I developed an agent-based simulation to investigate norm competition in international climate-change policy. In collaboration with . . .

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Melissa F. Baird

Melissa F. Baird

PhD, Anthropology, University of Oregon, December 2009

Contact

906-487-2366
mfbaird@mtu.edu

Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Heritage, and Environmental Policy

Melissa’s work engages multi-sited and comparative and ethnographic approaches to examine how multi-national corporations, the State, private sector, heritage experts, and other decision-makers draw on the rhetoric of heritage, rights, and sustainability in environmental decisions and management. Through the lens of resource frontiers, her research seeks to broaden our understanding of . . .

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Richelle L. Winkler

Richelle L. Winkler

PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2010

Contact

906-487-1886
rwinkler@mtu.edu

Assistant Professor of Sociology and Demography, Social Sciences

My research aims to understand and promote rural community sustainability. Most of my work examines population change as both a cause and a consequence of community well-being, and I am particularly interested in the relationships between population, environment, and community well-being. I employ both quantitative and qualitative research methods to answer . . .