Amy M. Marcarelli

Amy M. Marcarelli


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Associate Professor, Biological Sciences

  • PhD, Utah State University
  • BA, Colgate University


I am an ecosystem ecologist who studies biogeochemical cycles and linkages between physical, chemical and biological structure and function in watersheds. Linking these often requires understanding the underlying structure of microbial, algal, and animal communities. I am also working to place concepts of food webs into a broader ecosystem context by merging measurements of ecosystem production and food web pathways. Therefore, my research occurs at the interface of ecosystem and community ecology. I enjoy research that is both fundamental and applied, and have explored the interface between academia and management in projects examining the effects of salmon marine-derived nutrients on stream-riparian production and the effects of land use and habitat degradation on nutrient cycling and export from rivers.

One benefit of an academic career is the synergy between an active research program and undergraduate and graduate education. I currently teach undergrad and graduate courses in Limnology and Ecosystem Ecology, as well a professional development seminar for graduate students called The Scientific Profession where we cover topics related to grant writing, publishing, jobs, work-life balance, ethics, and gender issues, among many others.

Links of Interest

Research Interests

  • Limnology
  • Ecosystem Ecology of Streams and Rivers
  • Biogeochemistry

Recent Publications

  • Marcarelli AM, Huckins CJ, Eggert SL. 2015 (In Press). Sand aggradation alters biofilm standing crop and metabolism in a low-gradient Lake Superior tributary. Journal of Great Lakes Research. Read More
  • Coble AA, Marcarelli AM & Kane ES. 2015. Ammonium and glucose amendments stimulate dissolved organic matter mineralization in a Lake Superior tributary. Journal of Great Lakes Research 41:801-807. Read More
  • Collins SF, Marcarelli AM, Baxter CV & Wipfli MS. 2015. A critical assessment of the ecological assumptions underpinning compensatory mitigation of salmon-derived nutrients. Environmental Management 56:571-586. Read More
  • Ebel JD, Marcarelli AM, Kohler AK. 2014. Biofilm nutrient limitation, standing crop, and metabolism responses to experimental application of salmon carcass analog in Idaho streams. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 71:1796-1804. Read More
  • Marcarelli AM, Baxter CV, Wipfli MS. 2014. Nutrient additions to mitigate for loss of Pacific salmon: consequences for stream biofilm and nutrient dynamics. Ecosphere 5:69. Read More
  • Ray AM, Mebane CA, Raben F, Irvine KM, & Marcarelli AM. 2014. Evaluation of a combined macrophyte-epiphyte bioassay for assessing nutrient enrichment in the Portneuf River, Idaho, USA. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 186:4081-4096. Read More
  • Bechtold HA, Marcarelli AM, Baxter CV & Inouye RS. 2012. Effects of N, P and organic carbon on stream biofilm nutrient limitation and uptake in a semi-arid watershed. Limnology and Oceanography 57:1544-1554. Read More
  • Mineau MM, Baxter CV, Marcarelli AM & Minshall GW. 2012. An invasive riparian tree reduces stream ecosystem efficiency via a recalcitrant organic matter subsidy. Ecology 93:1501-1508 Read More
  • Scott JT & Marcarelli AM. 2012. Cyanobacteria in freshwater benthic environments. Pp 271-289 in: Whitton BA (ed) Ecology of Cyanobacteria II: Their Diversity in Time and Space. Springer. Read More