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Tech Memories

Last year my friends and I lived in Junkyard, and we were a very close hall. At the beginning of the year, we somehow got the idea of building cardboard armor. We all went down to the basement of DHH and spent hours putting our armor together . . . Read More

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20 hours ago - Huskies are #crazysmart about college tuition, too. Incoming class of 2018, check out these five Michigan Tech scholarships available now.
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Monday - What's better than a holographic keyboard? A real one, apparently. Text entry in virtual reality spaces needs both visual and tactile feedback, so computer scientist James Walker designed an experiment using a physical keyboard, a light-up keyboard seen through an OculusRift, and a tried-and-true autocorrect algorithm. . . . . #VR #CHI17 #CompSci #science #research #OculusRift #autocorrectsuccess #qwerty
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Monday - RT @mtuhky: Hockey Opens Season at Wisconsin on October 1 https://t.co/hR7nHdLQF8 #mtuhky #FollowTheHuskies https://t.co/2WNDLzqHI3
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Friday - 'Tis the season for tick checks. This 35-micron-long hair on the leg of a dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis) is a spike-like feature that helps it find, grasp, and climb onto hosts. Ticks may not fly—or even jump that far—but they do what's called "questing," and by waving their third and fourth legs like they're at a rock concert, they're better able to hitch a ride. However, ticks are fickle about humidity and temperature, and will hide under leaf litter to stay damp. To keep ticks off your own legs, keep them covered on hikes and check for hitchhikers after. Nymphs of the Lyme disease-carrying deer tick (Ixodes scapularis) may be only one to two millimeters across, about the size of a pinhead. 📷by Jeffrey Brookins on a #scanningelectronmicroscope. It placed as a runner-up in @jeol_usa 2016 SEM/TEM/EPMA Image Contest. #spectometry #NMR #ESR #michigantechunscripted #NorthwoodsProblems #TicksforScience #SEM #Microscope #science #sciart #STEAM #tickpics