Mechanical Engineering: A Tradition of Excellence

Our graduate program is ranked 49th in the nation among doctoral-granting mechanical engineering departments by the 2014 US News & World Report: America’s Best Graduate Schools.

The National Science Foundation ranks the Department of Mechanical Engineering–Engineering Mechanics as 22nd for research expenditures among all mechanical engineering departments in the US.

Learn more: ME at Michigan Tech | Graduate Programs | Undergraduate Degree

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Madhukar Vable

Madhukar Vable

PhD, Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan

Contact

906-487-2747
mavable@mtu.edu

Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering–Engineering Mechanics

Dr. Vable enjoys developing and using computational tools for stress analysis and design. He is currently developing a computer program based on boundary element method that can be used for design and analysis of isotropic and anisotropic bodies by users that have little or no knowledge of the boundary element . . .

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Edward Lumsdaine

Edward Lumsdaine

DSc, New Mexico State University

Contact

906-487-2977
lumsdain@mtu.edu

Professor, Mechanical Engineering–Engineering Mechanics

In recent years, Lumsdaine's interests have been in how to enhance learning, innovation, engineering design, quality, and teamwork in academia and industry. He has developed and taught contextual heat transfer, as well as math review and NVH (noise, vibration, and harshness) courses in industry. As a management consultant for Ford Motor . . .

Faculty Focus More Faculty

Madhukar Vable

Madhukar Vable

PhD, Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan

Contact

906-487-2747
mavable@mtu.edu

Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering–Engineering Mechanics

Dr. Vable enjoys developing and using computational tools for stress analysis and design. He is currently developing a computer program based on boundary element method that can be used for design and analysis of isotropic and anisotropic bodies by users that have little or no knowledge of the boundary element . . .