Student Engagement Surveys

These student engagement surveys collect information about student participation in programs and activities that institutions provide in and out of the classroom for learning and personal development as well as the perception that faculty members have of how students engage in these various activities. Student engagement represents two critical features of collegiate quality. The first is the amount of time and effort students put into their studies and other educationally purposeful activities. The second is how the institution deploys its resources and organizes the curriculum and other learning opportunities to get students to participate in activities that decades of research studies show are linked to student learning.

Learn more about NSSE | Learn more about FSSE

National Survey of Student Engagement

The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) is sponsored by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. The NSSE annually collects information at hundreds of four-year colleges and universities about student participation in programs and activities that institutions provide for learning and personal development of students. The results give an estimate of how undergraduates spend their time at college and what they gain from attending. For more information, please visit the NSSE quick facts or the NSSE & USA TODAY FAQ.

Michigan Tech's NSSE Reports

2012

Level of Academic Challenges (LAC)

Description

Challenging intellectual and creative work is central to student learning and collegiate quality. Colleges and universities promote high levels of student achievement by emphasizing the importance of academic effort and setting high expectations for student performance.





Criteria

  • Preparing for class (studying, reading, writing, doing homework or lab work, etc. related to academic program)
  • Number of assigned textbooks, books, or book-length packs of course readings
  • Number of written papers or reports of 20 pages or more; number of written papers or reports of between 5 and 19 pages; and number of written papers or reports of fewer than 5 pages
  • Coursework emphasizes the following:
    • Analysis of the basic elements of an idea, experience or theory
    • Synthesis and organizing of ideas, information, or experiences into new, more complex interpretations and relationships
    • Making of judgments about the value of information, arguments, or methods
    • Applying theories or concepts to practical problems or in new situations
  • Working harder than you thought you could to meet an instructor's standards or expectations
  • Campus environment emphasizes spending significant amounts of time studying and on academic work

Active and Collaborative Learning (ACL)

Description

Students learn more when they are intensely involved in their education and asked to think about what they are learning in different settings. Collaborating with others in solving problems or mastering difficult material prepares students for the messy, unscripted problems they will encounter daily during and after college.





Criteria

  • Asked questions in class or contributed to class discussions
  • Made a class presentation
  • Worked with other students on projects during class
  • Worked with classmates outside of class to prepare class assignments
  • Tutored or taught other students (paid or voluntary)
  • Participated in a community-based project (e.g., service learning) as part of a regular course
  • Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with others outside of class (students, family members, co-workers, etc.)

Student-Faculty Interaction (SFI)

Description

Students learn first-hand how experts think about and solve practical problems by interacting with faculty members inside and outside the classroom. As a result, their teachers become role models, mentors, and guides for continuous, life-long learning.





Criteria

  • Discussed grades or assignments with an instructor
  • Talked about career plans with a faculty member or advisor
  • Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with faculty members outside of class
  • Worked with faculty members on activities other than coursework (committees, orientation, student-life activities, etc.)
  • Received prompt written or oral feedback from faculty on your academic performance
  • Worked on a research project with a faculty member outside of course or program requirements

Enriching Educational Experiences (EEE)

Description

Complementary learning opportunities enhance academic programs. Diversity experiences teach students valuable things about themselves and others. Technology facilitates collaboration between peers and instructors. Internships, community service, and senior capstone courses provide opportunities to integrate and apply knowledge.





Criteria

  • Participating in co-curricular activities (organizations, campus publications, student government, social fraternity or sorority, etc.)
  • Practicum, internship, field experience, co-op experience, or clinical assignment
  • Community service or volunteer work
  • Foreign language coursework / study abroad
  • Independent study or self-designed major
  • Culminating senior experience (capstone course, senior project or thesis, comprehensive exam, etc.)
  • Serious conversations with students of different religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal values
  • Serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity than your own
  • Using electronic medium (e.g., listserv, chat group, Internet, instant messaging, etc.) to discuss or complete an assignment
  • Campus environment encouraging contact among students from different economic, social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds
  • Participate in a learning community or some other formal program where groups of students take two or more classes together

Supportive Campus Environment (SCE)

Description

Students perform better and are more satisfied at colleges that are committed to their success and cultivate positive working and social relations among different groups on campus.





Criteria

  • Campus environment provides the support you need to help you succeed academically
  • Campus environment helps you cope with your non-academic responsibilities (work, family, etc.)
  • Campus environment provides the support you need to thrive socially
  • Quality of relationships with other students
  • Quality of relationships with faculty members
  • Quality of relationships with administrative personnel and offices

Category Benchmarks for Research Universities

For this measure, Michigan Tech is considered a research university with "high research activity." Below are the mean scores for the five benchmarks, comparing Michigan Tech to the average NSSE 2012 scores. For more information, please visit the NSSE 2010 benchmark scores.



2009

Level of Academic Challenges (LAC)

Description

Challenging intellectual and creative work is central to student learning and collegiate quality. Colleges and universities promote high levels of student achievement by emphasizing the importance of academic effort and setting high expectations for student performance.





Criteria

  • Preparing for class (studying, reading, writing, doing homework or lab work, etc. related to academic program)
  • Number of assigned textbooks, books, or book-length packs of course readings
  • Number of written papers or reports of 20 pages or more; number of written papers or reports of between 5 and 19 pages; and number of written papers or reports of fewer than 5 pages
  • Coursework emphasizes the following:
    • Analysis of the basic elements of an idea, experience or theory
    • Synthesis and organizing of ideas, information, or experiences into new, more complex interpretations and relationships
    • Making of judgments about the value of information, arguments, or methods
    • Applying theories or concepts to practical problems or in new situations
  • Working harder than you thought you could to meet an instructor's standards or expectations
  • Campus environment emphasizes spending significant amounts of time studying and on academic work

Active and Collaborative Learning (ACL)

Description

Students learn more when they are intensely involved in their education and asked to think about what they are learning in different settings. Collaborating with others in solving problems or mastering difficult material prepares students for the messy, unscripted problems they will encounter daily during and after college.





Criteria

  • Asked questions in class or contributed to class discussions
  • Made a class presentation
  • Worked with other students on projects during class
  • Worked with classmates outside of class to prepare class assignments
  • Tutored or taught other students (paid or voluntary)
  • Participated in a community-based project (e.g., service learning) as part of a regular course
  • Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with others outside of class (students, family members, co-workers, etc.)

Student-Faculty Interaction (SFI)

Description

Students learn first-hand how experts think about and solve practical problems by interacting with faculty members inside and outside the classroom. As a result, their teachers become role models, mentors, and guides for continuous, life-long learning.





Criteria

  • Discussed grades or assignments with an instructor
  • Talked about career plans with a faculty member or advisor
  • Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with faculty members outside of class
  • Worked with faculty members on activities other than coursework (committees, orientation, student-life activities, etc.)
  • Received prompt written or oral feedback from faculty on your academic performance
  • Worked on a research project with a faculty member outside of course or program requirements

Enriching Educational Experiences (EEE)

Description

Complementary learning opportunities enhance academic programs. Diversity experiences teach students valuable things about themselves and others. Technology facilitates collaboration between peers and instructors. Internships, community service, and senior capstone courses provide opportunities to integrate and apply knowledge.





Criteria

  • Participating in co-curricular activities (organizations, campus publications, student government, social fraternity or sorority, etc.)
  • Practicum, internship, field experience, co-op experience, or clinical assignment
  • Community service or volunteer work
  • Foreign language coursework / study abroad
  • Independent study or self-designed major
  • Culminating senior experience (capstone course, senior project or thesis, comprehensive exam, etc.)
  • Serious conversations with students of different religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal values
  • Serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity than your own
  • Using electronic medium (e.g., listserv, chat group, Internet, instant messaging, etc.) to discuss or complete an assignment
  • Campus environment encouraging contact among students from different economic, social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds
  • Participate in a learning community or some other formal program where groups of students take two or more classes together

Supportive Campus Environment (SCE)

Description

Students perform better and are more satisfied at colleges that are committed to their success and cultivate positive working and social relations among different groups on campus.





Criteria

  • Campus environment provides the support you need to help you succeed academically
  • Campus environment helps you cope with your non-academic responsibilities (work, family, etc.)
  • Campus environment provides the support you need to thrive socially
  • Quality of relationships with other students
  • Quality of relationships with faculty members
  • Quality of relationships with administrative personnel and offices

Category Benchmarks for Research Universities

For this measure, Michigan Tech is considered a research university with "high research activity." Below are the mean scores for the five benchmarks, comparing Michigan Tech to the average NSSE 2009 scores. For more information, please visit the NSSE 2010 benchmark scores.



2007

Level of Academic Challenges (LAC)

Description

Challenging intellectual and creative work is central to student learning and collegiate quality. Colleges and universities promote high levels of student achievement by emphasizing the importance of academic effort and setting high expectations for student performance.



Criteria

  • Preparing for class (studying, reading, writing, doing homework or lab work, etc. related to academic program)
  • Number of assigned textbooks, books, or book-length packs of course readings
  • Number of written papers or reports of 20 pages or more; number of written papers or reports of between 5 and 19 pages; and number of written papers or reports of fewer than 5 pages
  • Coursework emphasizes the following:
    • Analysis of the basic elements of an idea, experience or theory
    • Synthesis and organizing of ideas, information, or experiences into new, more complex interpretations and relationships
    • Making of judgments about the value of information, arguments, or methods
    • Applying theories or concepts to practical problems or in new situations
  • Working harder than you thought you could to meet an instructor's standards or expectations
  • Campus environment emphasizes spending significant amounts of time studying and on academic work

Active and Collaborative Learning (ACL)

Description

Students learn more when they are intensely involved in their education and asked to think about what they are learning in different settings. Collaborating with others in solving problems or mastering difficult material prepares students for the messy, unscripted problems they will encounter daily during and after college.



Criteria

  • Asked questions in class or contributed to class discussions
  • Made a class presentation
  • Worked with other students on projects during class
  • Worked with classmates outside of class to prepare class assignments
  • Tutored or taught other students (paid or voluntary)
  • Participated in a community-based project (e.g., service learning) as part of a regular course
  • Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with others outside of class (students, family members, co-workers, etc.)

Student-Faculty Interaction (SFI)

Description

Students learn first-hand how experts think about and solve practical problems by interacting with faculty members inside and outside the classroom. As a result, their teachers become role models, mentors, and guides for continuous, life-long learning.



Criteria

  • Discussed grades or assignments with an instructor
  • Talked about career plans with a faculty member or advisor
  • Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with faculty members outside of class
  • Worked with faculty members on activities other than coursework (committees, orientation, student-life activities, etc.)
  • Received prompt written or oral feedback from faculty on your academic performance
  • Worked on a research project with a faculty member outside of course or program requirements

Enriching Educational Experiences (EEE)

Description

Complementary learning opportunities enhance academic programs. Diversity experiences teach students valuable things about themselves and others. Technology facilitates collaboration between peers and instructors. Internships, community service, and senior capstone courses provide opportunities to integrate and apply knowledge.



Criteria

  • Participating in co-curricular activities (organizations, campus publications, student government, social fraternity or sorority, etc.)
  • Practicum, internship, field experience, co-op experience, or clinical assignment
  • Community service or volunteer work
  • Foreign language coursework / study abroad
  • Independent study or self-designed major
  • Culminating senior experience (capstone course, senior project or thesis, comprehensive exam, etc.)
  • Serious conversations with students of different religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal values
  • Serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity than your own
  • Using electronic medium (e.g., listserv, chat group, Internet, instant messaging, etc.) to discuss or complete an assignment
  • Campus environment encouraging contact among students from different economic, social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds
  • Participate in a learning community or some other formal program where groups of students take two or more classes together

Supportive Campus Environment (SCE)

Description

Students perform better and are more satisfied at colleges that are committed to their success and cultivate positive working and social relations among different groups on campus.



Criteria

  • Campus environment provides the support you need to help you succeed academically
  • Campus environment helps you cope with your non-academic responsibilities (work, family, etc.)
  • Campus environment provides the support you need to thrive socially
  • Quality of relationships with other students
  • Quality of relationships with faculty members
  • Quality of relationships with administrative personnel and offices

Faculty Survey of Student Engagement

The Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE) was designed to complement the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), which is administered to undergraduate students. The faculty version focuses on:

  • Faculty perceptions of how often students engage in different activities.
  • The importance faculty place on various areas of learning and development.
  • The nature and frequency of faculty-student interactions.
  • How faculty members organize their time, both in and out of the classroom.

The project is coordinated by the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research. FSSE is designed to measure faculty expectations for student engagement in educational practices that are empirically linked with high levels of learning and development. Since 2003, over 140,000 faculty members from more than 590 different colleges and universities have responded to the survey.

Michigan Tech's FSSE Reports