Allison Mills

Allison Mills

Contact

  • awmills@mtu.edu
  • 906-487-2343
  • Cell: 906-231-4271
  • Administration Building G21
  • Associate Director of Research Communications, University Marketing and Communications

Biography

A through and through geek, Allison writes university research stories. She studied geoscience as an undergrad at Northland College before getting a master's in environmental science and natural resource journalism at the University of Montana. She moonlights as a dance instructor, radio fiend, and occasional rock licker.

Links of Interest

Her Beats

  • Sciences, Engineering and Technology
  • School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science

About Allison

  • She focuses on writing new stories about Michigan Tech research -- everything from robotic prostheses to mesocosms to the physics of raindrops.
  • A University of Montana graduate, she earned a master's degree in environmental science and natural resource journalism, which built on her bachelor's in geoscience from Northland College.
  • She's a radio geek.

Recent Stories

On-the-Fly Composites Modeling

The library building on campus has high walls full of windows.

Sure, they’re mixed metaphors — but just as modeling is a close estimate of real-world processes, so too are verbal explanations of such nuanced arithmetic. Trisha Sain, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, explores multiscale physics by thinking about the Lego bricks in her living room, the windows of skyscrapers and cooking a . . . Read More

Q&A with SATAVIA: Climate and Contrails

Blue sky with a long white contrail curving through.

It’s not rocket science. It’s harder — or at least harder to predict. Clouds are often referred to as the wildcard of climate modeling, and while some basic physics have become much clearer using tools like the cloud chamber at Michigan Technological University, atmospheric science remains a fascinating and complex space. . . . Read More

Driving in the Snow is a Team Effort for AI Sensors

From an overhead drone perspective, a car drives on a snowy road.

A major challenge for fully autonomous vehicles is navigating bad weather. Snow especially confounds crucial sensor data that helps a vehicle gauge depth, find obstacles and keep on the correct side of the yellow line, assuming it is visible. Averaging more than 200 inches of snow every winter, Michigan’s Keweenaw Peninsula is the perfect place to . . . Read More

Backyard Chickens, Rabbits, Soybeans Can Meet Household Protein Demand

Artsy close-up of homegrown eggs in a carton.

The 2020 meat shortages led many to wonder what to eat for protein when supply chains are disrupted. Some people turned to gathering eggs, raising animals and growing their own food. A team from Michigan Technological University and the University of Alaska Fairbanks found that the work is well worth it. In a new study published in . . . Read More