Fuller, Jennifer

Jennifer L. Fuller

Jennifer L. Fuller

PhD Candidate, Environmental Engineering

Jennifer L. Fuller is a native of Saginaw, Michigan where she graduated Salutatorian from Hemlock High School in 2007. Self-funded and the first generation in her family to attend college, Jennifer chose to attend an in-state public university with the aid of public and private scholarship. She enrolled at Michigan Technological University in Fall 2007. In her undergraduate career, Jennifer held internships at two Fortune 500 companies, Caterpillar Inc. and Kiewit Engineering Co. gaining valuable real-world experience. She also worked at Michigan Tech as an undergraduate research scholar and summer youth instructor teaching middle school and high school students. Jennifer lived and worked internationally in an isolated, developing region of Panama on her senior design micro-hydro power project. Ms. Fuller received a B.S. in Civil Engineering from Michigan Tech in Spring 2012, when she was awarded a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. This fellowship gave Jennifer the option to attend any university in the United States on full scholarship and she proudly decided to bring the funding back to her home state, enrolling in graduate school at Michigan Technological University in Fall 2012. As an NSF fellow, she is currently advised by Dr. Jennifer Becker in Environmental Engineering.

Her graduate work will provide the field application component to Dr. Becker’s laboratory and modeling research in bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in groundwater contamination. Ms. Fuller will conduct research for the world’s largest known contaminated groundwater site located in Mancelona, MI. The site contains an estimated 13 trillion gallons of groundwater contaminated with Trichloroethylene (TCE) over the EPA maximum contaminant level. TCE is a volatile organic chemical found in industrial and household degreasing agents, and it is a human carcinogen. Alongside research and courses, Jennifer has been an advisor for student groups on various projects for the Keweenaw Research Center including local applications for geothermal energy from abandoned mine shaft water and micro-hydro power. Jennifer is also involved with the Center for Science and Environmental Outreach where she teaches Water and Engineering classes for local middle and high school students.