Track A

SS2501: American history Since 1877

Bill Gale

M – Thurs: 9:35 – 10:50

How have Americans made sense of the ideals of freedom and liberty in their daily lives over the last 130 years? How can the study of history help us understand how America got from 1877 to the present, all the while debating among ourselves what it means to be an American? These and many other questions are raised and explored in an introductory survey course on American history that focuses on why the conditions and meanings of freedom have changed over time.

SS 2600: American Government and Politics (online)

Adam Wellstead

Online (online course fee applies)

How dysfunctional is the US government? Are ideas such as freedom, individualism and liberty still important?  What role does religion play in US politics?  How does policy get made?  These are some of the questions examined in an online course examining US government and politics.

SS2610: Introduction to Law and Society

Susanna Peters

M – Thurs: 12:35 – 1:50

Explore legal questions involving crime & punishment, race, ethnicity, bank fraud, environmental degradation, religion and torture -  both for real and  on film.  In this class students will uncover the connection between law, justice and culture through film, TV,  literature and actual Supreme Court case law.  Students will also engage in weekly and course long debates on both the underlying issues and the accuracy of their portrayal in popular culture.

SS 3210: Field Archaeology, 2 – 8 credits

Tim Scarlett

Times variable – inquire, some evening and weekend times will be required

Join MTU’s field research at the Cliff Mines for the fifth summer of excavation and survey, practical and theoretical aspects of field data recovery will be taught along with aspects of public archeology, come and help make a difference with the past!

SS 3530: The Automobile in America

Laura Rouleau

M – Thurs 12:35 – 1:50

We will examine the automobile in diverse ways, seeing it as a complex product to be manufactured, as a stimulus to reshaping the environment, as an object that has altered social behavior, and as a problem solver and problem maker.

SS 3541: The Copper Country

Bill Gale

M – Thurs: 11:05 – 12:20

What is that silver building rising up on top of Quincy Hill, overlooking Houghton and MTU? Who knew that America’s first mining boom was on the Keweenaw Peninsula? The Copper Country (SS 3541) looks at the rich social history of the copper mining era of 100 years ago and brings it into the present day landscape of ruins, heritage sites, and memories. So much of what we see everyday on campus and in Houghton can be traced back to a copper mining era that fueled America’s industrialization and shaped a distinctive local landscape of shafthouses, company towns and, of course, MTU itself.

SS3750: History of Canada (online)

Adam Wellstead

Online (online course fee applies)

Which Prime Minister communicated with his dead mother using a crystal ball?  Who really won the War of 1812? Did the Vikings discover North America some 400 years before Columbus? These are some of the questions examined in an online course examining Canada's colo(u)rful history from European discovery to the present.

SS 3920: Experimental Archeology

Carl Blair

M – Thurs: 11:05 – 12:20

Join in the 10th year of a course unique to MTU, how is archaeological data generated, not recovered?  Help us burn, crush, pound, mix, and cook and we explore how people in the past built and created technologies, some out of class time is required as is willingness to get “down and dirty”

UN1025: Global Issues (two sections)

Carl Blair or Steve Walton

M- Thurs 9:35 – 10:50 or 11:05 – 12:20

Global issues in a small seminar setting, unlike the large lecture classes during the academic year.  In this course you will learn about the major structural components of globalization, like population, environment, economics, and governance and how they interact with culture and sustainability in our rapidly changing world.  UN1025 is required of every student and investigating these topics in a small class setting will be more engaging and satisfying, leading to greater appreciation and understanding of the issues facing the world today.

Track B

SS2501: American history Since 1877

Bill Gale

M – Thurs: 9:35 – 10:50

How have Americans made sense of the ideals of freedom and liberty in their daily lives over the last 130 years? How can the study of history help us understand how America got from 1877 to the present, all the while debating among ourselves what it means to be an American? These and many other questions are raised and explored in an introductory survey course on American history that focuses on why the conditions and meanings of freedom have changed over time.

SS 2700: Introduction to Sociology

Carl Dassbach

M – Thurs: 9:35 – 10:50

Introduces students to the way that sociologists think about different components of society. Topics include the family, religion, markets, organizations, political systems, and educational systems. Also covers the source of individual values, beliefs, and attitudes.

SS 3210: Field Archaeology, 2 – 8 credits

Tim Scarlett

Times variable – inquire, some evening and weekend times will be required

Join MTU’s field research at the Cliff Mines for the fifth summer of excavation and survey, practical and theoretical aspects of field data recovery will be taught along with aspects of public archeology, come and help make a difference with the past!

SS 3540: History of Michigan

Laura Rouleau

M – Thurs: 8:05 – 9:20

The history of Michigan from before European settlement to the present, who has here first, what did they do, what happened later, and how does this relate to today?

SS 3541: The Copper Country

Bill Gale

M – Thurs: 11:05 – 12:20

What is that silver building rising up on top of Quincy Hill, overlooking Houghton and MTU? Who knew that America’s first mining boom was on the Keweenaw Peninsula? The Copper Country (SS 3541) looks at the rich social history of the copper mining era of 100 years ago and brings it into the present day landscape of ruins, heritage sites, and memories. So much of what we see everyday on campus and in Houghton can be traced back to a copper mining era that fueled America’s industrialization and shaped a distinctive local landscape of shafthouses, company towns and, of course, MTU itself.

SS 3710: Social Problems

Carl Dassbach

M – Thurs: 12:35 – 1:10

Examines both the social construction of social problems and substantive problems confronting modern society by considering the distinct understandings of social problems offered by the two major theoretical traditions in sociology and analyzing specific macro and micro social problems.

SS 3990: Finnish History and Culture

Ted Holmstrom

M- Thurs: 11:05 -12:20

 The history and people of Finland will be explored looking at social, economic and political issues. Learn about the place where our local community draws much of its rich cultural heritage.

UN1025: Global Issues

Mark Rouleau

M- Thurs 12:35 – 1:50

Global issues in a small seminar setting, unlike the large lecture classes during the academic year.  In this course you will learn about the major structural components of globalization, like population, environment, economics, and governance and how they interact with culture and sustainability in our rapidly changing world.  UN1025 is required of every student and investigating these topics in a small class setting will be more engaging and satisfying, leading to greater appreciation and understanding of the issues facing the world today.

Frontiers and Fortresses: Study Abroad in England

Carl Blair

July 6 – Aug 4

Explore the archaeology and history of northern England, all students will take three courses, SS 3560 – history of England I, SS 3920 – Archaeology of the North, and SS 3960 – International Experience, all three are HASS listed.  If a fourth course is needed for financial aid that can be arranged.  Space is limited, all applications must be completed by early April, consult with Dr. Carl Blair or IPS, a program fee of $4,000 applies.