The researchers collected data about cloud droplet clustering during a Cloud Systems
      Evolution in the Trades (CSET) study flight onboard the Gulfstream-V High-performance
      Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research aircraft operated by the
      National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the National Science Foundation
      (NSF). The HOLODEC is the underwing pronged instrument closest the body of the plan.
      Image Credit: Susanne Glienke

The Secret Life of Cloud Droplets

Do water droplets cluster inside clouds? Researchers confirm two decades of theory with an airborne imaging instrument.

Two days into the still-active flooding situation, Adam Johnson decided that he was
      tired of looking at destruction and set to work taking photos of hope, connection,
      and recovery. (Adam Johnson/Brockit, Inc.)

Copper Country Strong

Historic flash floods ripped through the Keweenaw in June. Nature’s show of strength was met by another force to be . . .

Milky Way over Deadvlei in Namibia. What planet is this? It is the only planet currently
      known to have trees. The trees in Deadvlei, though, have been dead for over 500 years.
      Located in Namib-Naukluft Park in Namibia (Earth), saplings grew after rainfall caused
      a local river to overflow, but died after sand dunes shifted to section off the river.
      High above and far in the distance, the band of our Milky Way Galaxy forms an arch
      over a large stalk in this well-timed

From This Small and Drifting Planet

NASA's InSight lander touched down on Mars this Monday. To honor explorers (and robots) going boldly where no one has . . .

David Hemmer, dean of the College of Sciences and Arts, explains why the liberal arts
      are integral to Michigan Tech's success as a university.

Tech Forward: Liberal Arts Education in a Technological University

Michigan Technological University’s thought leaders share their ideas to prepare students and the University for a rapidly changing future. David . . .

In the News

Claudio Mazzoleni (Physics), Lynn Mazzoleni (Chem) and graduate student Simeon Schum were featured in the article “Aerosol problem: Adding a . . .