Katie Richards Gray

Katie Richards Gray

Katie Richards Gray

BS, Geology, Michigan Tech, 2007
Current position: Geoscientist, Baker Atlas

     “I started out as a chemical engineer and then switched from chemical engineering to chemistry to chemical engineering to chemistry and finally found geology (three years into my schooling) and thought: ‘Why on earth didn’t I find this earlier?!’ All kidding aside, I had a very difficult time in the geophysics and plate tectonics course. It was a tough class with a good teacher (Jimmy Diehl).

     “Going on the field trip for Wayne’s well logging class is what made me want to become a field engineer. From that point on, there were no ifs, ands, or buts; I was GOING to be a field engineer and I was GOING to work for Baker Atlas/Baker Hughes!”

     For Gray, making new friends and having professors that actually cared was the best part about her time at Michigan Tech. “If it weren’t for the professors in the GMES department, I honestly don’t know if I would have graduated. Bill Gregg was my advisor and he’s the one that convinced the dean to let me stay in school. His passion for learning is what made me want to try hardest in his classes (all five that he offered). The one thing that he told me that still sticks with me today is that “If someone tells you that you can’t, prove them wrong. You can do anything that person can and you can do it better than they ever could. Also, never believe in 'Christmas tree folds', they don’t exist!!” (This was all in the same conversation.) When I told him that I wanted to be a field engineer for Baker Hughes, he told me to do it and be the best at it. His passion and persistence is what showed me that I could do anything I wanted, as long as I felt passionately about it.

     Gray most certainly achieved her goal. She started as a Field Engineer for Baker Atlas/Baker Hughes in July 2007 in Rock Springs, WY. I’m currently working as a Geoscientist III for Baker Atlas in Houston, TX.

     Her advice for student considering the geosciences? “Just try it. The Introduction to Geology course will definitely let you know whether it’s where you need to be, or not. And if you are still wondering, take another course. Oh, and one more thing, if you like being knee deep in mud, enjoy wet feet in a river, windy days and field trips to remote locations no matter the weather, then this could very well be the major for you!”